Saturday, June 7, 2014

Alhamdulillah. Mission Karate-Do 2014: Malaysia Milo Championship. One week final solid preparations n 2 days of marvellous performance in the tournament days. All the best my students n congrats for those who already won medals. Sensei proud of u guys. Keep it up. 

COME, hantar anak2 anda untuk hidup yang lebih sihat,kuat,ceria n bermakna di Kelas Karate-Do for gen-Y with Sensei Iman!!!: CALL Sensei: 014-2265758.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Happy Exams

Exam Preparation: Ten Study Tips

Preparing for exams? Give yourself the best chance with these top ten study tips.

1. Give yourself enough time to study
Don't leave it until the last minute. While some students do seem to thrive on last-minute 'cramming', it's widely accepted that for most of us, this is not the best way to approach an exam. Set out a timetable for your study. Write down how many exams you have and the days on which you have to sit them. Then organize your study accordingly. You may want to give some exams more study time than others, so find a balance that you feel comfortable with.

2. Organize your study space
Make sure you have enough space to spread your textbooks and notes out. Have you got enough light? Is your chair comfortable? Are your computer games out of sight?
Try and get rid of all distractions, and make sure you feel as comfortable and able to focus as possible. For some people, this may mean almost complete silence; for others, background music helps. Some of us need everything completely tidy and organized in order to concentrate, while others thrive in a more cluttered environment. Think about what works for you, and take the time to get it right.

3. Use flow charts and diagrams
Visual aids can be really helpful when revising. At the start of a topic, challenge yourself to write down everything you already know about a topic - and then highlight where the gaps lie. Closer to the exam, condense your revision notes into one-page diagrams. Getting your ideas down in this brief format can then help you to quickly recall everything you need to know during the exam.

4. Practice on old exams
One of the most effective ways to prepare for exams is to practice taking past versions. This helps you get used to the format of the questions, and - if you time yourself - can also be good practice for making sure you spend the right amount of time on each section.

5. Explain your answers to others
Parents and little brothers and sisters don't have to be annoying around exam time! Use them to your advantage. Explain an answer to a question to them. That will help you to get it clear in your head, and also to highlight any areas where you need more work.

6. Organize study groups with friends
Get together with friends for a study session. You may have questions that they have the answers to and vice versa. As long as you make sure you stay focused on the topic for an agreed amount of time, this can be one of the most effective ways to challenge yourself.

7. Take regular breaks
While you may think it's best to study for as many hours as possible, this can actually be counterproductive. If you were training for a marathon, you wouldn't try and run 24 hours a day! Likewise studies have shown that for long-term retention of knowledge, taking regular breaks really helps.
Everyone's different, so develop a study routine that works for you. If you study better in the morning, start early before taking a break at lunchtime. Or if you're more productive at nighttime, take a larger break earlier on so you're ready to settle down come evening.
Try not to feel guilty about being out enjoying the sunshine instead of hunched over your textbooks. Remember Vitamin D is important for a healthy brain!

8. Snack on 'brain food'
Keep away from junk food! You may feel like you deserve a treat, or that you don't have time to cook, but what you eat can really have an impact on energy levels and focus. Keep your body and brain well-fuelled by choosing nutritious foods that have been proven to aid concentration and memory, such as fish, nuts, seeds, yogurt and blueberries. The same applies on exam day - eat a good meal before the test, based on foods that will provide a slow release of energy throughout. Sugar may seem appealing, but it won't help when your energy levels crash an hour or so later.

9. Plan your exam day
Make sure you get everything ready well in advance of the exam - don't leave it to the day before to suddenly realize you don't know the way, or what you're supposed to bring. Check all the rules and requirements, and plan your route and journey time. If possible, do a test run of the trip; if not, write down clear directions.
Work out how long it will take to get there - then add on some extra time. You really don't want to arrive having had to run halfway or feeling frazzled from losing your way. You could also make plans to travel to the exam with friends or classmates, as long as you know they're likely to be punctual!

10. Drink plenty of water
As a final tip, remember that being well hydrated is essential for your brain to work at its best. Make sure you keep drinking plenty of water throughout your revision, and also on the exam day.

15 Tips for Succeeding on the Day of the Exam:

Exam Tip #1
Wake up early so that you do not need to rush through having breakfast and getting ready.

Exam Tip #2
Check the venue and time of the exam to make sure that you have not confused the day/time/venue.

Exam Tip #3
Have a balanced breakfast and eat nothing risky (probably not the best day to have a super-hot curry!). Bananas are always a good option.

Exam Tip #4
Before leaving home, check that you have everything that you will need – ID, stationery, map to the exam venue, etc.

Exam Tip #5
Head to the exam with plenty of time. A lot of unexpected events can happen on your way there and you do not want to be late!

Exam Tip #6
If there are people around who are panicking, avoid them. They are not doing you any favor!

Exam Tip #7
Go to the toilet before the exam starts. Exams can be quite long and there is no time to waste.

Exam Tip #8
Remember to write your name on the exam paper. You would not believe how many people have forgotten to do it!

Exam Tip #9
Read all the questions carefully before starting and quickly plan how much time to allocate to each.

Exam Tip #10
Start answering the questions that you feel most confident about. There is no need to answer the questions in order.

Exam Tip #11
If your brain freezes, just start writing anything and you will soon start remembering more details.

Exam Tip #12
Don’t spend more time than you planned on a particular section/question or you might run out of time to answer other questions and gain those extra marks! Also, leave any questions that you are unsure about for the end.

Exam Tip #13
Don’t be afraid to ask the examiner if you are not clear on a question.

Exam Tip #14
Use every minute of the exam and if you have time left, review your answers before handing back the paper.

Exam Tip #15
Stay calm, you have done your homework and have nothing to fear!

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Sunday, April 20, 2014

IIUM Karatedo Closed Tournament 2014

As the captain of IIUM Karatedo Team, I hereby gladly announce the results of IKCT2014.

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Sensei's Advice

Shoshin (初心) is a concept meaning "beginner's mind". It refers to having an attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions when studying a subject, even when studying at an advanced level, just as a beginner in that subject would. The term is especially used in the study of Japanese martial arts.

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Club Organization Chart 2013/2014

Ameen Topa

Vice President


Assistant Secretary

Financial Controller

Assistant Financial Controller

Training Bureau

Demo. Bureau

Quartermaster Bureau

Entrepreneur Bureau

Multimedia Bureau

Publicity & Promotion Bureau

Monday, June 10, 2013

Harakatul Qadam

What we have learned in dojo tonight:

Harakatul Qadam - "حَــرَكةُ القَـدَم"


Or as we all know "Footwork." :D

Footwork is a martial arts and combat sports term for the general usage of the legs and feet in stand-up fighting. Footwork involves keeping balance, closing or furthering the distance, controlling spatial positioning, and/or creating additional momentum for strikes.

Here's an additional info for you, for reading this post:

Tai sabaki (体捌き) is a term from Japanese martial arts and which relates to 'whole body movement', or re-positioning. It can be translated as body-management. It is a term used widely in kendo, jujutsu, aikido, judo, karate and ninjutsu. Tai sabaki is usually used to avoid an attack, such that the receiver of the attack ends up in an advantageous position and it is often wrongly referred to as evasion.